Artistic Director

  • Massimiliano Guido

    m-guido

    Massimiliano Guido is a Senior Researcher at the Musicology and Cultural Heritage Department of Pavia University, where he teaches courses on History of Musical Instruments and Music Theory. He previously served as Banting Post Doctoral Fellow (2012-14) and PDRF Fellow (2011) at the Schulich School of Music, McGill University, where he worked on historical improvisation at the keyboard. In 2013-14 he was the principal investigator of the international research project Improvisation in Classical Music Education: Rethinking our Future by Learning our Past, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (www.mentemani.org/Connection). He organized two international conferences on improvisation and he is the editor of Studies in Historical Improvisation: from Cantare super Librum to Partimenti (Routledge, 2017).
    He holds degrees in musicology (Pavia Univ. Doctorate and Laurea, Göteborg Univ. Master of Music Research), organ (Parma Conservatory) and harpsichord (Como Conservatory). His writings cover a variety of subjects, such as music theory, performance practice, organ building, and art song.
    He is the chair of the Interest Group on Improvisation of the Society of Music Theory. He is also active as organist, harpsichordist, and clavichordist.

Steering Committee

  • Edoardo Maria Bellotti

    Edoardo Bellotti is Associate Professor of Organ, Harpsichord and Improvisation at Eastman School of Music (University of Rochester). He has extensive teaching experience, having been Professor of Organ, Harpsichord and Improvisation in several musical institutions and universities including the Conservatory of Trossingen and the University of Bremen in Germany, the University of Udine and the Conservatory of Trento in Italy.
    A virtuoso organist and renowned improviser, Bellotti performs at leading festivals and concert venues throughout the world. He is currently collaborating in a project of new organ music and visual art in Milan, in conjunction with the art installation of the American minimalist Dan Flavin. He has performed the complete works of Cesar Franck, and has worked with orchestras in Italy and abroad, performing a wide spectrum of repertoire, including the Italian premiere of Satyagraha by Philip Glass. He is also considered a leading expert in the performance of renaissance and baroque keyboard music.
    He combines his international performing career with musicological research and teaching, publishing articles as well as new critical editions of music of the 17th and 18th centuries. He is a frequent guest lecturer at international conferences. He has made several critically acclaimed recordings on historical instruments, including Promenade (Loft Recordings), a recording of organ repertoire and original improvisations on the Eastman School of Music’s Italian baroque organ at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester.

  • Joel Speerstra


    Joel Speerstra is a Senior Researcher at the Göteborg Organ Art Center and a Lecturer at the Academy of Music and Drama at the University of Gothenburg. He is active as an instrument builder, performer, teacher, and musicologist.
    He studied the organ with William Porter and David Boe at Oberlin Conservatory before continuing in Europe on several grants that allowed him to study organ and clavichord with Harald Vogel as well as instrument building with John Barnes.
    The bulk of his recent concert-playing has been divided between the organ and the clavichord, often linked directly to a conference, masterclass or summer course.
    With Per Anders Terning has built more than fifty pedal clavichords, and manual clavichords, for individuals and institutions in Europe, North America, and Asia. He is a recent recipient of the Hilding Rosenberg prize in Musicology from the Royal Swedish Academy of Music.

Teachers

  • Enrico Baiano

    Enrico Baiano (Naples, 1960) is an Italian harpsichordist and fortepianist, known on the international stage as a virtuoso and strict interpreter of early music.
    Baiano has earned a number of international awards including the Deutsche Schallplattenpreis, Diapason d’Or, Choc de la Musique and Platte des Monats. He has written Method for Harpsichord: A practical guide for Pianists, Organists and Harpsichordists published by Ut Orpheus and translated into five languages. He has performed at the most renowned early music festivals in Europe, Israel and Japan with repertoire ranging from 16th to 21st century. He is one of the co-founders of the Italian ensemble “Cappella della Pietà dei Turchini”, with whom he has played and recorded from 1986 to 2000. He has also played with the Neapolitan contemporary music ensemble “Dissonanzen”, with Piccolo concerto “Wien” and with the Helsinki Baroque Orchestra.[2] He took part in two documentary films directed by Francesco Leprino: ‘Un gioco ardito – dodici variazioni tematiche su Domenico Scarlatti’ and ‘Sul nome B.a.c.h.’.

  • Edoardo Maria Bellotti

    Edoardo Bellotti is Associate Professor of Organ, Harpsichord and Improvisation at Eastman School of Music (University of Rochester). He has extensive teaching experience, having been Professor of Organ, Harpsichord and Improvisation in several musical institutions and universities including the Conservatory of Trossingen and the University of Bremen in Germany, the University of Udine and the Conservatory of Trento in Italy.
    A virtuoso organist and renowned improviser, Bellotti performs at leading festivals and concert venues throughout the world. He is currently collaborating in a project of new organ music and visual art in Milan, in conjunction with the art installation of the American minimalist Dan Flavin. He has performed the complete works of Cesar Franck, and has worked with orchestras in Italy and abroad, performing a wide spectrum of repertoire, including the Italian premiere of Satyagraha by Philip Glass. He is also considered a leading expert in the performance of renaissance and baroque keyboard music.
    He combines his international performing career with musicological research and teaching, publishing articles as well as new critical editions of music of the 17th and 18th centuries. He is a frequent guest lecturer at international conferences. He has made several critically acclaimed recordings on historical instruments, including Promenade (Loft Recordings), a recording of organ repertoire and original improvisations on the Eastman School of Music’s Italian baroque organ at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester.

  • Malcolm Bilson

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    Malcolm Bilson has been in the forefront of the period instrument movement for more than thirty years. A member of the Cornell University Music Department since 1968, where he is the Frederick J. Whiton Professor of Music Emeritus, he began his pioneering activity in the early 1970s as a performer of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert on late 18th- and early 19th-century pianos. He has been a key contributor to the restoration of the fortepiano to the concert stage and to fresh recordings of the mainstream repertory.
    In addition to an extensive career as a soloist and chamber player, Mr. Bilson has toured with the English Baroque Soloists with John Eliot Gardiner, the Academy of Ancient Music with Christopher Hogwood, the Philharmonia Baroque under Nicholas McGegan, Tafelmusik of Toronto, Concerto Köln, and other early and modern instrument orchestras around the world. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by Bard College, is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a recipient of the James Smithson Bicentennial Medal at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, for his extraordinary lifetime achievements as “a pioneer in the performance of period instruments and chamber music in general.” In 2015 he was awarded the Order of the Hungarian Gold Cross by the president of Hungary for his “significant international artistic and scholarly career, and in recognition of his decades-long contributions to Hungarian musical life.”
    Mr. Bilson has recorded the three most important complete cycles of works for piano by Mozart:
    the piano concertos with John Eliot Gardiner and the English Baroque Soloists, the piano-violin sonatas with Sergiu Luca, (no longer available) and the solo piano sonatas.

  • Armando Carideo

    Armando Carideo, born in Torremaggiore (FG) in 1944, studied piano, organ and composition with Maestro Antonio Demonte, organist of the Cathedral of Turin; after which he specialized in musical paleography at the Institute of Musical Paleography in Rome.
    He combines his concert activity with the profession of musicologist and organologist, publishing essays of musicology and history of organ.
    The assiduous research in Italian and European libraries led to the discovery of important musical sources published in a critical edition by the publishing house “Ut Orpheus” of Bologna.
    Since 2000 he took the direction of sources collection for keyboard of the Historical Italian Organ Institute.
    He recorded his first CD (1998) with music by F. Fierce for the label Esperia.
    He has collaborated with the Superintendents of Lazio and Abruzzo as an expert for the cataloging and restoration of historic organs. From 1996 to 2000 he was organist of the organ Feliciano FAITHFUL (1726) in the Basilica of St. Bernardino in L’Aquila. He is currently organist organ of Philip Head (1701) in the Basilica of St. Maria in Trastevere (Rome).
    Since 2005 he teachs at the Smarano International Organ Academy (Trento).
    Professor of History of Musical Instruments at the University of Rome Tor Vergata 2000-2009.
    Author of the first critical edition of Bernardo Pasquini keyboard works.

  • Ulrika Davidsson

    Ulrika Davidsson is a versatile musician, who maintains a performance career on the piano, fortepiano, clavichord, as well as the harpsichord. She teaches historical keyboard instruments at the Royal Danish Academy of Music, Copenhagen, and at the Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. From 2007 to 2012 she was Assistant Professor of Historical Keyboards at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, as well as Music Director of Rochester City Ballet, and the Draper Center for Dance Education in Rochester. Ulrika Davidsson has given concerts throughout Europe, and in the US, Canada, Japan, and South Korea, and has presented recitals and lectures at many international academies and conferences. She has been featured as piano soloist with a number of orchestras in her native Sweden, she has toured with many chamber music ensembles, and has appeared on national television and radio. Dr. Davidsson has graduated from the Eastman School of Music with a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in piano performance and historical keyboards, studying with Barry Snyder, and a Master’s degree in harpsichord performance under the tutelage of William Porter. She also holds a Master of Fine Arts degree in piano performance and pedagogy from the University of Gothenburg where Elisif Lundén-Bergfelt was her teacher; and the Organist and Cantor Diploma from The Royal Academy of Music. In Amsterdam, she studied piano with Willem Brons at the Sweelinck Conservatory. From 1990 to 1999 she served on the faculty of the School of Music, University of Gothenburg. A generous grant from the University of Gothenburg gave her the opportunity to study fortepiano with Malcolm Bilson, and clavichord with Harald Vogel. 2008–2013 she was on the faculty of the Hochschule für Künste Bremen. Her solo CD ‘Haydn Sonatas. Galanterien to Sturm und Drang’ has been released on Loft Recordings. In 2013 she was the recipient of Adlerbertska konststipendiet.

  • Massimiliano Guido

    m-guido

    Massimiliano Guido is a Senior Researcher at the Musicology and Cultural Heritage Department of Pavia University, where he teaches courses on History of Musical Instruments and Music Theory. He previously served as Banting Post Doctoral Fellow (2012-14) and PDRF Fellow (2011) at the Schulich School of Music, McGill University, where he worked on historical improvisation at the keyboard. In 2013-14 he was the principal investigator of the international research project Improvisation in Classical Music Education: Rethinking our Future by Learning our Past, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (www.mentemani.org/Connection). He organized two international conferences on improvisation and he is the editor of Studies in Historical Improvisation: from Cantare super Librum to Partimenti (Routledge, 2017).
    He holds degrees in musicology (Pavia Univ. Doctorate and Laurea, Göteborg Univ. Master of Music Research), organ (Parma Conservatory) and harpsichord (Como Conservatory). His writings cover a variety of subjects, such as music theory, performance practice, organ building, and art song.
    He is the chair of the Interest Group on Improvisation of the Society of Music Theory. He is also active as organist, harpsichordist, and clavichordist.

  • William Porter

    Porter studied organ at Oberlin College and Yale University where he received the DMA degree in 1980. He taught harpsichord and organ at Oberlin from 1974 to 1986 and taught organ, music history and music theory at the New England Conservatory in Boston from 1985 to 2002. He has also taught organ improvisation at the Eastman School of Music and McGill University.
    He has an article on North German Improvisational Practice in GOArt Research Reports Vol. 2 and an article on contrapuntal improvisation in the GOArt Research Reports, Vol. 3.

  • Derek Remeš

    My name is Derek Remeš (pronounced Remish) and I am a music theorist, teacher, organist, pianist, and composer. Welcome to my website!
    I am currently a PhD candidate in Music Theory at the Hochschule für Musik in Freiburg, Germany. Prof. Dr. Felix Diergarten is my advisor. I am also a Lehrbeauftragter at the Freiburg Hochschule in the subjects of Partimento, Harmonielehre, and Gehörbildung (ear training).
    I have completed the recitals and coursework for the Organ DMA at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, studying repertoire with David Higgs and improvisation with Edoardo Bellotti. (I am currently on a leave of absence.) In my five years at Eastman I completed all coursework for the PhD in Music Theory, received the MA in Music Theory Pedagogy (2017), the MM in Organ (2014), and the Performer’s Certificate (2015). Before that I completed two BM degrees—in Classical Composition and Film Scoring—from Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA (2010, summa cum laude). My primary teachers there were Profs. Dennis Leclaire, Greg Fritze, and Alla Cohen.
    My dissertation attempts to reconstruct J. S. Bach’s compositional pedagogy as it relates to thoroughbass, chorale, and fugue. The impetus for this project was Robin A. Leaver’s recent reassessment of a source in the Sibley Library (Rochester, NY) as likely stemming from J. S. Bach’s students. My initial research into this source won the Emerging Scholar Award at the Music Theory Society for New York State in 2017 and has since been published in this article.
  • Giorgio Sanguinetti

  • Joel Speerstra


    Joel Speerstra is a Senior Researcher at the Göteborg Organ Art Center and a Lecturer at the Academy of Music and Drama at the University of Gothenburg. He is active as an instrument builder, performer, teacher, and musicologist.
    He studied the organ with William Porter and David Boe at Oberlin Conservatory before continuing in Europe on several grants that allowed him to study organ and clavichord with Harald Vogel as well as instrument building with John Barnes.
    The bulk of his recent concert-playing has been divided between the organ and the clavichord, often linked directly to a conference, masterclass or summer course.
    With Per Anders Terning has built more than fifty pedal clavichords, and manual clavichords, for individuals and institutions in Europe, North America, and Asia. He is a recent recipient of the Hilding Rosenberg prize in Musicology from the Royal Swedish Academy of Music.

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